IEEE 5th World Forum on Internet of Things
15-18 April 2019 – Limerick, Ireland

Tutorials

Download Camera-Ready Tutorial Submission Guidelines

TUT1-Fog/Edge Computing and Networking
TUT2-Communication System Design and Challenges for the Implementation of IoT Context Aware Environments
TUT3-IoT Dynamic Virtual Organization Framework
TUT4-High‐Performance Wireless for Industry 4.0 and Beyond: Use‐cases, Technology Landscape and Future Roadmap
TUT5-IoT Lab in a Box: Development and Experiences with an Open Source Mobile Laboratory for the Internet of Things
TUT6-Internet of Things Systems: A Guided Tour with Interoperability Focus (Withdrawn)
TUT7-Internet of Bio‐Nano Things: Transmitter and Receiver Architectures for Molecular Communications
TUT8-Industrial Internet of Things: From Best Effort to Quality of Service
TUT9-Beyond Standards Compliant Internet of Things Data Streams
TUT10-Emerging Low Power Wireless Technologies for IoT (ZigBee, LoRa and 6LoWPAN)
TUT11-Cryptography in a Trusted Blockchain World: Promise, Practice, and Applications
TUT12-Emerging Chemical/Bio Sensors for Internet of Thing


TUT1-Fog/Edge Computing and Networking

Presenters:
Douglas N. Zuckerman, IEEE ComSoc and Board Member of OpenFog Consortium, USA; Hung-Yu Wei, National Taiwan University, Taiwan; David Belanger, Senior Research Fellow, Stevens Institute of Technology, New Jersey, USA; Hanna Bogucka, Poznan University of Technology, Poznan, Poland; Russell Hsing, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan; Yang Yang, ShanghaiTech University, Shanghai, China; John Zao, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan

Abstract: Introduction and background on basic fog principles, including relationship to edge and cloud computing. Example use cases where fog is needed for desired functionalities and performance, e.g., autonomous cars, energy management, robotics, industrial IoT. The following topics will be considered in the tutorial:

  • Issues and applications of fog/edge computing to IoT.
  • Fog and edge reference architectures and road maps
  • Key organizations or consortia working on implementation agreements and standards for both fog and edge computing
  • Published and draft standards (e.g. IEEE P1934, OpenFog, ETSI MEC)
  • Test beds and potential ways these may be used for conformance and other types of interoperability testing
  • Data analytics in the fog/edge computing environment
  • Security and trust in fog/edge systems
  • Challenges and opportunities in Fognomics (including pricing, user incentives, and other economic aspects of fog/edge computing)
  • Summarize key future technologies that will depend on fog, e.g., 5G/6G Wireless.

TUT2-Communication System Design and Challenges for the Implementation of IoT Context Aware Environments

Presenter: Francisco Falcone, DIEEC and ISC, Universidad Pública de Navarra, Spain

Abstract: The implementation of Context Aware environments require intensive use of multiple communication systems, mainly wireless in the case of edge connectivity, in order to enable fully interactive operation. The progressive introduction of connected devices of multiple types, within an IoT framework imposes relevant restrictions owing to large device density, low form factors and inherent energy consumption restrictions. In this tutorial we will provide an overview of the trends, limitations and challenges in relation with communication system design, considering multiple system and Heterogeneous Network operation. Device characteristics (transceiver parameters and requirements in terms of Input/Output signal processing, transmission bit rate requirements and energy consumption profiles), network design/integration (cooperative network operation, Intra-Inter Radio Access Technology operation) and specific protocol description (CoopMAC schemes, lightweight protocols, energy efficient routing protocols) will be given in order to provide a comprehensive and holistic overview for Communication System requirements in IoT use cases. Coverage/capacity relations will also be introduced, in order to understand limitations given by interference in the particular case of high density, large scale transceiver networks expected in Context Aware environments.

TUT3-IoT Dynamic Virtual Organization Framework

Presenter: Morcous M. Y. Massoud, Faculty of Computers and Information, Cairo University, Egypt

Abstract: IoT Dynamic Virtual Organization Framework (IoTDVO) is theoretical description framework to create Dynamic Virtual Organizations (DVO) at the knowledge level. DVOF has been utilized CommonKADS knowledge engineering methodology to model DVO. By utilizing CommonKADS the knowledge of the problem can be structured in three stages context level, concept level and artifact levels DVOF has been identified three models namely 1) “New Federated Collaborative Networked Organization Model (FCNOM)”, 2) “Virtual Business Collaboration Knowledge Model (VBCKM) and 3) “Collaboration Network Organization Grid‐Cloud Convergence Architecture (CNOGCA) Based on Open Grid Services Architecture (OGSA). Each model is composed by an ontology that describes each of the entities covered by the model and where applicable a set of design patterns.
In this tutorial we will focus on “Virtual Business Collaboration Knowledge Model (VBCKM)”.

TUT4-High‐Performance Wireless for Industry 4.0 and Beyond: Use‐cases, Technology Landscape and Future Roadmap

Presenters:Adnan Aijaz, Telecommunications Research Laboratory, Toshiba Research Europe Ltd., Bristol, U.K.; Mahesh Sooriyabandara, Telecommunications Research Laboratory, Toshiba Research Europe Ltd., Bristol, U.K.

Abstract: Driven by cyber‐physical systems (CPSs) and Internet‐of‐Things (IoT) technologies, the recent Industry 4.0 initiative aims at enhancing the flexibility, productivity, versatility and efficiency of legacy industrial systems. It is envisioned to create highly efficient, massively connected, vastly dynamic, and fully self‐organized next generation industrial systems. With industry 4.0, several new industrial control applications emerge that connect machines, devices, people and processes in real‐time. Essential to Industry 4.0 is the implementation of a robust and efficient connectivity layer, capable of dealing with diverse and challenging requirements. Traditionally, industrial control applications have been realized through wired technologies. Wireless technologies are not only beneficial for legacy industrial applications but also crucial in realizing the vision of Industry 4.0. However, the use of wireless for control‐centric applications is still in infancy. To this end, this tutorial focuses on the emerging area of high‐performance wireless for industrial communication. In essence, it sheds light on the role of high‐performance wireless in legacy, emerging and future industrial systems. The technical content covers the evolution of industrial networks, key use‐cases and applications with analysis of connectivity requirements, technology landscape associated with the vision of high‐performance wireless and a roadmap characterizing future industrial systems and highlighting future research directions.

TUT5-IoT Lab in a Box: Development and Experiences with an Open Source Mobile Laboratory for the Internet of Things

Presenters: Michael Core, School of Electrical & Electronic Engineering, Dublin Institute of Technology, Ireland; Frank Duignan, School of Electrical & Electronic Engineering, Dublin Institute of Technology, Ireland; Paula Kelly, School of Electrical & Electronic Engineering, Dublin Institute of Technology, Ireland; Damon Berry, School of Electrical & Electronic Engineering, Dublin Institute of Technology, Ireland

Abstract: Interest in The Internet of Things (IoT) has expanded far beyond the original domain of embedded systems engineering. A complete IoT taught module must address a broad range of technologies, both hardware and software, often requiring the use of specialised embedded system laboratory facilities. Furthermore, IoT modules often rely on the use of open‐source software resources. This requires experience and a significant management overhead when it comes to ensuring that selected resources are inexpensive, yet fit for purpose. This tutorial describes how the authors reconfigured and redeployed a conventional undergraduate IoT module offering, to enable its delivery with a minimum of specialist materials. The purpose of this redevelopment was to enable a broader audience reach, to remove some of the practical issues associated with delivering an IoT module and to facilitate its delivery outside of a laboratory environment. The tutorial outlines the rationale behind the initiative and demonstrates how an IoT module, including components of the MEAN stack of web technologies and Bluetooth Smart, can be taught using inexpensive, pre‐configured hardware components and open source software solutions.

TUT7-Internet of Bio‐Nano Things: Transmitter and Receiver Architectures for Molecular Communications

Presenter: Ergin Dinc, Electrical Engineering Division, Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, UK

Abstract: Internet of Everything (IoE), the seamless interconnection and autonomous coordination of massive number of computing elements, animate and inanimate entities, people, processes and data through the Internet infrastructure, is an emerging research direction towards enabling the Connected Universe from single molecules to vehicles and people. Towards this objective, Internet of Bio‐Nano Things (IoBNT), i.e., a recently emerged information and communication technology framework, is focused on extending IoE into living organisms in the form of artificial networks of nanoscale functional units, such as nanobiosensors and engineered bacteria, integrated with the Internet infrastructure. This objective necessitates the utilization of new communication modalities such as molecular communication (MC), which is a bio‐inspired communication method that uses molecules for transmitting and receiving information, in the same way that living cells communicate. The talk will cover the advancements on theoretical MC research as well as various transmitter/receiver designs for MC in the literature together with numerable modulation, coding and detection techniques. These works fall into domains of a very wide spectrum of disciplines, including but not limited to information and communication theory, quantum physics, materials science, nanofabrication, physiology and synthetic biology. Thus, the talk will provide a complete overview of MC towards realizing IoBNT concept.

TUT8-Industrial Internet of Things: From Best Effort to Quality of Service

Presenters: Georgios Z. Papadopoulos, IMT Atlantique, Rennes, France; Nicolas Montavont, IMT Atlantique, Rennes, France

Abstract: With the large adoption of small and smart objects, the Internet of Things aims to provide a large and universal access to a very heterogeneous set of devices. In particular, the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) aims to connect time‐critical devices, for industrial applications. Cost reduction can be achieved, by replacing the existing cables with a wireless medium, as long as an appropriate level of service for critical applications can still be guaranteed at all times. To that aim, the network must exhibit deterministic performance in terms of network reliability and timely delivery. More precisely, an industrial communication framework must provide several nines of reliability in data delivery. For instance, several consecutive losses in an industrial automation control loop are sufficient to stop a production chain. Moreover, it should guarantee a worst case latency for a data packet across the network. This latency must be known in advance, and remain constant throughout the lifetime of the associated path. In order to replace wires, a wireless network should exhibit a high delivery ratio with an ultralow jitter, regardless of transient variations in the wireless medium and of the network congestion.

TUT9-Beyond Standards Compliant Internet of Things Data Streams

Presenters: Paul Stacey, School of Informatics & Engg., Institute of Technology Blanchardstown, Dublin, Ireland; Damon Berry, School of Electrical & Electronic Engg., Dublin Institute of Technology, Dublin, Ireland

Abstract: SensorThings API avoids overly constraining information objects by allowing variability. Where variability exists, interoperability is often compromised for individual use‐cases. When implementing systems that produce SensorThings API compliant data flows, developers must make localised decisions on how to implement data structures. Often these implementations are non‐standardised and diminish the possibility of applying the: collect, use, use multiple times philosophy. SensorThings API is aligned to the ISO/OGC O&M data standard, and like O&M it is semi‐structured. Semi‐structured models allow for variance within implementations for different use‐cases, which is both necessary and detrimental to systems interoperability. This tutorial explores the twolevel modeling methodology within the Internet of Things domain. Two‐level modeling introduces the concept of archetypes. Archetypes can allow extensions or profiles of SensorThings API to be documented and published within a diverse community. Participants will be guided through a two‐level modeling tutorial, where they will gain the basic knowledge needed to engage in a two‐level modeling activity. Participants will gain hands on experience of the two‐level modeling process and the art of developing archetypes using the SensorThings API data model. During this tutorial we re‐imagine the INSPIRE Marine Pilot using a two‐level modeling methodology, underpinned by the SensorThnigs API data model.

TUT10-Emerging Low Power Wireless Technologies for IoT (ZigBee, LoRa and 6LoWPAN)

Presenter: Ata Elahi, Southern Connecticut State University, New Haven, Connecticut, USA

Abstract: Due to the fast growth of IoT applications, the ZigBee Wireless Sensor, and LoRa Wireless Technologies, have become the most widely used technologies for IoT devices. They are used in automation processing, chemical plants, refineries, Reading Meters (water, gas, electric), and commercial buildings as well as home automation. This pervasive integration of ZigBee and LoRa technologies into IoT implies that the use of wireless sensors is becoming more prominent and that control networks are rapidly growing. Furthermore, Forbes Magazine projects that the IoT market will be a $457 billion industry by the year 2020. To accommodate this burgeoning technology, numerous standards are being developed for wireless sensors and control networking such as SP100.11 (Wireless Systems for Automation) by the Industrial Standard for Automation (ISA), Wireless HART (Highway Addressable Remote Transducer) by the HART organization, IPv6 over Low Rate Wireless Personal Network (6LoWPAN) by IETF (the Internet Engineering Task Force), Thread Wireless Technology (Thread Group), LoRaWAN by LoRa alliance, and ZigBee by the ZigBee alliance. The following is a list of the more common applications for wireless sensors and control networks.

TUT11-Cryptography in a Trusted Blockchain World: Promise, Practice, and Applications

Presenter: Rameez Asif, Edinburgh Napier University, United Kingdom

Abstract: Contracts, financial transactions, and the records associated with them are among the elucidating structures in our economic, legal, and political systems. These interactions are not limited to the individuals but to the nations, organizations and communities. As the technology landscape is expanding, it is vital to have a knowledge of what the core digital technologies have to offer, especially with respect to the data‐encryption and communication. Blockchain promises to solve this problem. The technology at the heart of crypto‐currencies, is an open, distributed ledger that can record transactions in a verifiable way. In a trusted Blockchain world, we can envision the records are embedded in a digital code and stored in transparent, shared databases, where they are protected from deletion, tampering, and revision. While cryptography is used to preserve privacy, economic incentives are used to encourage desired behavior of network actors who do not trust or know each other, nor have any legally binding agreements with each other. In this tutorial, we first survey the state of the art, focusing on private Blockchain (in which parties are authenticated). Furthermore, we analyze both in‐production and research systems in four dimensions: distributed ledger, cryptography, consensus protocol, and smart contract.

TUT12-Emerging Chemical/Bio Sensors for Internet of Thing

Presenters: Hari Chauhan, Analog Garage ‐ Analog Devices Inc., Boston, MA, USA; Brian Harrington, Analog Garage ‐ Analog Devices Inc., Boston, MA, USA; Mohamed Azize, Analog Garage ‐ Analog Devices Inc., Boston, MA, USA; Tadhg Kennedy, School of Natural Sciences, University of Limerick, Ireland

Abstract: The ballyhoo surrounding the Internet of Thing is increasingly being realized in real world system rollouts. At the same time, there has been tremendous advancement in the science and technology of miniaturized sensors for biosensing applications to assist healthcare. These applications range from microorganism (such as bacteria) detection for health and food quality to critical biomarker detection for prognostics and diagnostics of severe diseases. The proposed tutorial is an attempt to provide comprehensive insight to the integrated biosensing systems for IoT applications.